Category Archives: Places

San Francisco from the Berkeley Hills

I took a short detour on my way home to check the views of San Francisco and found some interesting cloud coverage over the bay. A short drive home turned into a 2 hour session up in the Berkeley hills. I took a few shots as the sun sat and into the night. it took some experimenting but I settled on a 5 second shutter at 6 second intervals to keep the iso at a low setting. here’s the result.

Capitola

Village by the sea

360 photo hosted by google, make sure to view it in full screen for the full effect.

Fun Times with Time-Lapse

this is the Interstate 5 Aquaduct Vista Point. The name may not fit but that’s what its called on the map. located just west of Newman California, this rest stop offers a panoramic view of the valley.
I shot this with my D5600 and I set it for 3 second intervals for about 45 minutes on a sunny and (initially) cloudy day. I didn’t have a lot of luck as the clouds dissipated soon after I started shooting and the wind caused to camera shake. but nothing that couldn’t be fixed in post, along with the typical time-lapse flicker issues that are typical of these kinds of videos

Bernal Heights Park & equirectangular things

fun with 360 photos in interesting places.

I’m an equirectangular photo

Bernal Heights Park in San Francisco has sweeping views of the city. Which is as good a reason as any to shoot a 360 photo. I’m still using Google’s Street View App to manually take all the photos needed for a 360 degree shot. which doesn’t really do that great of a job, so some cleanup was necessary but I did find a useful desktop app to help with the editing called Pano2VR which does some cool conversion tricks, like converting equirectangular (see photo to the left) photos to cubic (see photo below) and vice versa.

So whats up with these formats?

The Cubic format consists of 6 undistorted, perspective images: up, down, left, right, forward and backward, whereas the Equirectangular format is one single, stitched image of 360° horizontally and 270° vertically. The Cubic format suffers from less distortions than the Equirectangular, but the Equirectangular seems to be more popular.

the final product; so after some research, trial and error and some old fashioned photo editing I finished up with the 360 photo below.  Pano2VR turned out to be a great tool not just for conversion between formats but also for the end user experience.

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600×480 doesn’t do it justice,  full screen it and enjoy the view.

360 Valley View

my first foray into the photosphere world turned out to be a lot more work then I was planning for, as it turns out it’s a bit more complex then a panorama.  but I did accomplish what I set out to do and I learned a lot in the process. I used the google street view app to take the photo, I also took a few panoramas just in case I had stitching issues, which I did. and I used pano2vr to convert between formats and photoshop to edit, I’ll go into more details about all that in a future post.

it was a good day for photos, blue skys with cumulus clouds all day so I took advantage of the opportunity and took some shots on and around Merced Falls road. there’s lots of scenic views of the valley out there.

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the small resolution doesn’t do it justice so make sure to full screen it.

Wisco and Mil-Town

one final excursion to end 2016. A place where the beer flows like wine, where beautiful women instinctively flock like the salmon of Capistrano. A little place called Wisconsin…

not the best time of year for photos but I managed to grab a few

 

Emerald Bay and the Joys of creating Panoramas

Photoshop is the most popular image editing application out there, but that doesn’t make it the best solution for every task. like photo stitching, which is something your going to need to do if you want to create seamless panoramas. I’ve been using Photoshop’s photomerge function for some time now but I’ve just recently discovered Autopano which has made the whole process faster and much less cumbersome.

here is a side-by-side of the results, you can see how photomerge failed to stitch the seam perfectly, leaving the image sheared where the original two images met to form the panorama. a common problem that takes a lot of time to fix.

 

I took a short day trip to Lake Tahoe for these shots of Emerald Bay; the top image is the photoshop image and the bottom is the autopano image. I cropped and corrected the colors but left the stitching exactly as it was produced by the application.

Emerald Bay

Photomerge

Emerald Bay

Autopano

interestingly enough, photomerge normalized all the photos and erred on the light side, and autopano erred on the dark side. which is usually preferable but it also produced some strange color variation that didn’t correlate to the stitching. nevertheless its typically easier to fix tone issues then it is to fix stitching issues.

one of the biggest problems with panoramas is the time it takes to make sure it’s done right. but with the right tools, I may be posting more of them in the future.